Yellow Terror: The Collections and Paintings of Roger Shimomura
Apr
1
to Aug 30

Yellow Terror: The Collections and Paintings of Roger Shimomura

  • Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The exhibit includes paintings of Roger Shimomura accompanied by memorabilia and objects from his collection depicting racial stereotypes of Asians and Asian Americans.

This exhibit comes from the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian American Experience in Seattle, WA.  To arrange group tours, contact ONLC at 503.288.0520 or info@oregonnikkei.org. Museum hours: Tues-Sat, 11:00-3:00; Sun, 12:00-3:00. Admission, $5.00; free to ONLC members. 

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Oregon Film Premiere: Never Give Up! Minoru Yasui and the Fight for Justice
Mar
28
7:00pm 7:00pm

Oregon Film Premiere: Never Give Up! Minoru Yasui and the Fight for Justice

On March 28, 2017 the documentary film Never Give Up! Minoru Yasui and the Fight for Justice (Part One) will premiere in Salem. The public program will start at 7:00 pm, and the film will be followed by a discussion. The premiere is a special event sponsored by the Salem Progressive Film Series and admission is $5.00.

Minoru (Min) Yasui, son of Japanese immigrant parents, was born in 1916 and raised in the farming community of Hood River, Oregon. He was the first Japanese American attorney in Oregon, and during World War II, he initiated the first legal test challenging the forced removal from the West Coast and subsequent incarceration of over 120,000 persons of Japanese ancestry in U.S. concentration camps. He spent nine months in solitary confinement awaiting his appeal to the U.S. Supreme Court.

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Minoru Yasui Day at Portland City Hall
Mar
28
12:30pm12:30pm

Minoru Yasui Day at Portland City Hall

This year, 2017, marks the 75th anniversary of Minoru “Min” Yasui’s challenge of the military orders pursuant to Executive Order 9066, discriminating against persons of Japanese ancestry in 1942.

Portland Mayor Ted Wheeler will read a proclamation officially apologizing to Japanese Americans who were forced to leave their homes during World War II.The program that will include speakers and a dramatic presentation.

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Exhibit Opening: Architecture of Internment: The Build up to Wartime Incarceration
Mar
28
12:00pm12:00pm

Exhibit Opening: Architecture of Internment: The Build up to Wartime Incarceration

This exhibit will travel to multiple locations in Oregon and is designed to prompt discussion. One of the sites is the Expo Center in North Portland, once known as the Pacific International Livestock and Exposition Center, modified in 1942 into the Portland Assembly Center.  It was one of 16 temporary civilian jails to hold Japanese Americans and Japanese nationals and was hastily repurposed from livestock to human use, with up to 3,676 people housed under one roof.  The Assembly Center was in use from May until September 1942 when Japanese Americans were then sent to incarceration camps in Minidoka, Idaho, Tule Lake, California; and Heart Mountain Wyoming.

This project funded by Meyer Memorial Trust and Regional Arts and Culture Counci.

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Minoru Yasui Day
Mar
28
12:00am12:00am

Minoru Yasui Day

In the fall of 2016, Minoru Yasui became the only Oregonian to be awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President Obama.  In 2016, the State of Oregon unanimously passed a bill making March 28th Minoru Yasui Day in perpetuity.

 

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Architecture of Internment: The Build up to Wartime Incarceration
Mar
27
7:00pm 7:00pm

Architecture of Internment: The Build up to Wartime Incarceration

  • 5736 Northeast 33rd Avenue Portland, OR, 97211 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

History Pub at McMenamin's Kennedy School Theatre, 7:00 pm. Organizers: Oregon Historical Society, McMenamins, and Holy Names Heritage Center. Pop-Up Exhibit Architecture of Internment: The Build up to wartime Incarceration, and panel discussion in honor of Min Yasui Day. Free and open to the public.

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HELP NEEDED: REMEMBER US Tag Project
Mar
19
to Apr 28

HELP NEEDED: REMEMBER US Tag Project

CALLING ALL COMMUNITY MEMBERS TO ENGAGE IN THIS PROJECT.  WE NEED ORGANIZATIONS, SCHOOLS AND CLUBS TO HELP US CREATE THE TAGS BY THE END OF APRIL.

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE EMAIL: Chatamoves@gmail.com 

This COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT PROJECT will remember the 3600 people who were held at the Portland Assembly Center by creating a tag and number of their names and adding your name and country of origin to hang with them.  These "tags" will hang together on a long rope and displayed and carried in a pilgrimage visual/performance piece remembering those who were housed and held against their will at the former Portland Livestock Exposition Center.

This "rope" will be a temporary memorial to Japanese Americans and an active way for all of us to understand the history and racism of EO9066 and the history leading up to it. Workshop participants will have an active way to come together in community and remember those takenand also by join their own “tag” of their family's country of origin and their immigration to America.  These two tags will hang side by side. Everyone who created a "tag of memory" can join in the pilgrimage to the Expo Center on May 6th, the first day or incarceration at the Portland Assembly Center.

FOR THIS PROJECT WE WILL HAVE AVAILABLE TO YOU:   

Materials provided:

  • Poster explaining the project
  • Tags
  • Pens
  • Direction sheets  
  • Information sheets with the Names and numbers of those held at the Portland Assembly center
  • A way to stay connected
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Know Your Rights, Presented by the Oregon Asian Pacific American Bar Association and the Oregon Hispanic Bar Association
Feb
23
3:00pm 3:00pm

Know Your Rights, Presented by the Oregon Asian Pacific American Bar Association and the Oregon Hispanic Bar Association

  • 200 Southwest Market Street Portland, OR, 97201 United States (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

CONTACT: Please RSVP to: LReeves@bullardlaw.com.

Thank you to OAPABA, OHBA and Bullard Law for their sponsorship of this event.

Regardless of what side of an issue you may be on, there is no doubt a heightened sense of civic engagement and political discourse in the air and an increase in public gatherings of various types concerning statements and actions by public officials.  As you and your clients enter these new times, come learn about the basic rights of those who are traveling or attending public gatherings, including guidance drawn from aspects of immigration law; First Amendment and Article I, section 8 law; and search and seizure and other criminal law.

The format of this presentation will be in the form of hypothetical scenarios to which a panel of experts will respond and issue spot. If you would like to submit a scenario or question for consideration, please email it along with your RSVP.

This event is free but space is limited.

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PCC Remembers Executive Order 9066
Feb
21
2:00pm 2:00pm

PCC Remembers Executive Order 9066

The month of February is a time to celebrate love and the enduring human spirit. On February 21, PCC will mark the 75th anniversary of Executive Order 9066 – an act, born of hatred and fear, that sent more than 120,000 Japanese-Americans to internment camps during World War II... including a camp here in Portland, Oregon.

Please join PCC President Mark Mitsui for a remembrance of EO 9066. The event will include historic displays, reflections and a panel discussion that will:

  • Educate our community about the events that led to this decision, and the atrocities and outcomes resulting.
  • Draw parallels to significant public discourse today.
  • Encourage our community to learn to recognize the rhetoric of hate that leads to widespread fear and sweeping characterizations, and to stand against it.
  • Honor those who experienced this moment in time by sharing stories.
  • Affirm PCC's values of inclusion, equity, access and opportunity.

Panelists and special guests

Mari Watanabe, Partners in Diversity Executive Director

Peggy Nagae, Portland lawyer who successfully argued for reparations to families affected by EO 9066

Wajdi Said, Muslim Educational Trust President

Harry Anastasiou, PSU Conflict Resolution Chair

John Shaw, PCC History instructor

Lynn Fuchigami Longfellow, Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center

Sho Dozono, Portland business leader

Michael Dembrow, Oregon State Senator

Please plan to stay following the formal program for a reception and viewing of a historic display brought to us from the Oregon Nikkei Legacy Center, a Japanese American history museum in NW Portland. The display will include a replica of the Congressional Gold Medal awarded to the Japanese American WWII Nisei Soldiers of the 100th Infantry Battalion, the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and the Military Intelligence Service. The exhibit will be on display February 17 -24, 7am - 10pm.

By acknowledging this painful moment in history, we choose to reaffirm PCC's values of inclusion and opportunity for all, and to invite our community to join with us in supporting a vision where all peoples, regardless of origin, are able to equitably access and create a successful future.

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 Unfinished Business: The Japanese-American Internment Cases
Feb
20
7:00pm 7:00pm

Unfinished Business: The Japanese-American Internment Cases

  • Reed College Performing Arts Bldg., 320 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

As a commemoration of the 75th anniversary of the Japanese American Internment, we'll be showing two films by Steven Okazaki.

Unfinished Business: The Japanese-American Internment Cases
(1985, 58 min.)
Academy Award Nominee, Best Feature Documentary

Days of Waiting
(1990, 28 min.)
Academy Award Winner, Best Short Documentary

On February 19, 1942, two and a half months after the bombing of Pearl Harbor, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt signed Executive Order 9066 authorizing the forced internment of Japanese Americans on the West Coast in “relocation centers".  These two acclaimed films document experiences of Japanese American internment, a timely reminder of a still shocking yet often obscured chapter in U.S. history.

Presented by the Reed College American Studies program. Free and open to the public.

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Never Again: Japanese Americans Remember
Feb
19
11:00am11:00am

Never Again: Japanese Americans Remember

  • Japanese American Historical Plaza (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Hosted by Jenna Yokoyama and Traci Yokoyama Kiyama

Join Japanese-Americans for a Day of Remembrance gathering on Sunday, February 19 from 11am-1pm at the Japanese-American Historical Plaza. On this day, we remember the signing of Executive Order 9066, the order that led to the forced incarceration of over 120,000 Americans of Japanese ancestry during World War II.

This gathering is intended as a space for Japanese-Americans to come together, to reflect, and to share our story. If your family went to the camps, feel free to bring pictures or bring your stories about how the signing of EO 9066 affected your family then and how it echoes into now. We hope you gather with us even if you’re family went to the camps, but your family left you with no stories to share.... The silence about the camps is an important element of our shared history that many are confronting still. Let’s confront it together.

The organizers of this event are yonsei (fourth generation Japanese-Americans). We believe that it is important for Japanese-Americans to remember why we say #neveragain on this day. Telling our stories to one another reminds us of our community and our shared history. We also believe that it’s important for our community to gather physically in the Plaza on this day as a statement of solidarity for those who, today, find themselves where we once were.

This is NOT a protest or a rally. This is a PEACEFUL GATHERING primarily for the Japanese-American community to be together in vigil.

ALL PEOPLE ARE INVITED to join us at the Plaza in remembrance, but we ask that non-Japanese-Americans take a step back and take the opportunity to listen to the stories of others who have experienced the consequences of American racism and xenophobia. Please be respectful of the space you are in. This is a somber occasion for the Japanese-American community.

Signs are welcome. Some suggestions for a DIY sign:
"#NeverAgain"
"Day of Remembrance"
"We Were Banned Too"
"Silence is Violence"

Or make a sign with the name of one of the concentration camps:
Minidoka Internment Camp, Idaho
Topaz Internment Camp, Central Utah
Colorado River (Poston) Internment Camp, Arizona
Gila River Internment Camp, Phoenix, Arizona
Granada (Amache) Internment Camp, Colorado
Heart Mountain Internment Camp, Wyoming
Jerome Internment Camp, Arkansas
Rohwer Internment Camp, Arkansas
Manzanar Internment Camp, California
Tule Lake Internment Camp, California
Sand Island Internment Camp, Hawaii
Honouliuli Internment Camp, Hawaii

THANK YOU to Studio Sign Co. for providing our banner.

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75th Anniversary of the Signing of Executive Order 9066
Feb
19
12:00am12:00am

75th Anniversary of the Signing of Executive Order 9066

February 19th is the date seventy-five years ago, when Executive Order 9066 was issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. This order gave the military authority to take necessary action to remove and incarcerate persons of Japanese ancestry along the west coast of America.  On this date we recognize and support the goals of the Japanese American community to once again hold a National Day of Remembrance to never forget how the government targeted and singled out American citizens who looked like the “enemy.”

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